Tuesday, October 4, 2011

Faction:



Faction
University of Dayton, Dayton, Ohio
Oct. 3-27, 2011
Reception and panel discussion: Tuesday, Oct. 18, 6-8 PM

Chris Ashley
Timothy B. Buckwalter
Ron Buffington
Marc Cheetham
Brian Cypher
Scott Grow
Matthew Langley
Daniel Levine
Lorri Ott
Jon Poblador
Danielle Riede
Don Voisine
Ken Weathersby
Michael Willie
Douglas Witmer
R.C. Wonderly

Curated by Jeffrey Cortland Jones



For more about my work in this show: 104 a/b (a.k.a. aqua-twin)

Monday, October 3, 2011

Abyss, Abbess, Abet:

Emily Auchincloss solo show, "Abyss, Abbess, Abet"

Sept. 12 - Oct. 7, 2011
Kent Place Gallery
42 Norwood Avenue
Summit, NJ 07902

"Auchincloss’s paintings expressively pull apart and reconstruct a syntax of image, symbol and space in their relational webs." -- Ken Weathersby

"The title of the show is descriptive: as the three words of the title have an alliterative relationship, they also have a poetic relationship between their meanings, a certain rhythmic hiccupping when spoken, and a further branching of meanings when considered singularly. The work is meant to function in similar territory." -- Emily Auchincloss




Abyss, Abess, Abet, installation view, Kent Place Gallery

Abyss, Abess, Abet, reception, Kent Place Gallery

Abyss, Abess, Abet, reception, Kent Place Gallery


Abyss, Abess, Abet, installation view, Kent Place Gallery

Ocean for an Overtaker, Oil on Canvas, 54" x 44", Emily Auchincloss





 




Time Is the Diamond:

My solo exhibition of a group of very small works at Some Walls in Oakland, CA closed recently.
To see full images and text about the show, go here: 
Time Is the Diamond













Chris Ashley's essay:
Ken Weathersby’s "Time is the Diamond"
Some argue that painting, like Humpty Dumpty, has fallen off the wall, taken a great fall, and can’t be put back together again: dropped, cracked open, oozed out, and finished. But painters like Ken Weathersby have shown that painting appears to continue living a healthy life long after its reported demise. Paintings do things and are about things that other mediums can’t match. While much art continues on a seemingly rapid path towards newer technologies and entertainment, encouraging fast looking and sound bite-like understanding, the technology of most painting, handmade and viewed slowly, at a finely granular level, might gradually be seen as anti-technology, or rather, as a kind of antidote to quicker, bigger, and shinier art. The technology of painting is more like Fred Flintstone’s car, made out of stone, wood, and animal skins, and powered and stopped by the driver’s feet.
In addition to the fundamentals of painting, however, its literal and conceptual deconstruction is an issue inherent to the medium throughout history. Painting has moved from being made on a specific wall, to being made for a specific wall or setting, and ultimately made to be completely portable and adaptable to different environments. Patronage has shifted among the church, the state, the wealthy, and the commoner. And, periodically, the question asked again and again is, just what is a painting: what shape is it, is it flat, how does it hang, what size is it, and must it be made with paint?
Ken Weathersby’s art engages smartly and sensitively with the possibilities of painting. Simultaneously clear-minded and intuitive, rational and risky, he pulls painting apart and puts it back together, making something new and quirky and thoughtful. Canvases are sliced and diced, but unlike Lucio Fontana’s cuts opening a void, Weathersby’s cuts are surgical, so that parts can be reattached, or transplanted, or opened to view another level of the painting. He cuts, rotates, shifts, reverses, and inserts. The classic grid or checkerboard is interrupted or made imperfect. Fronts and backs visibly co-exist, and the rarely seen chassis, staples, nails, screws, and threads are exposed. Elaborate carpentry normally behind the scenes becomes a central player. Weathersby’s paintings don’t merely question what a painting is, but provide physical evidence of several visual and philosophical resolutions to the properties, problems, expectations, and contradictions of painting by exploring front and back, inside and outside, the plane of the surface and depicted and actual space, pattern and disruption, and craft and art.
Weathersby’s small works, made with foam core, linen, wood, tape, and the images of his work reproduced on exhibition announcements, are not exactly studies. Although they use many of the same motifs and structures and share the same subjects and concepts found in his larger size work, they are individual pieces that can stand alone. To call them miniatures would not be an insult or diminution, but instead a useful label to place these small pieces as a specific set within Weathersby’s body of work. And though small, each works scale reads as large and full-sized, or, rather, right-sized.
Lined up on a simple shelf and leaning against the wall are twenty-two works in less than twelve linear feet, the smallest measuring approximately 2.5 x 1.5 inches, the largest, a real outlier, at just over 8 x 5 inches. This installation, Time is the Diamond, titled after a song by the American band Low, provides an overview and record of Weathersby’s invention, wit, and curiosity, of what painting might be, aspires to be, and can’t overcome. The song’s dense, abstract, almost impenetrable lyrics have a folk quality, listing things the singer is or is not, or has and has lost, akin to the hybrid and transgressive qualities in Weathersby’s art that are ultimately resolved, over time, in honed, precise, finished works:
If I’m not a lion
And I’m not an island
If time is the diamond
Well all right.
Weathersby’s art is extremely forthright but not immediately fully forthcoming; initially appearing accessible, it is complicated, dense, and full of rich and intriguing contradiction. At a quick glance, his images are of a type one might expect to be manufactured, but instead we see that every single aspect of the work is handcrafted, from the elaborate stretchers and framing, to the taped and painted areas, to the surface cuts and insertions. Materially and structurally, he makes plain how the object is made, but there is often a sense of peekaboo or sleight of hand in the layers, displacement, and disruption of image and spaces. One would expect the use of the grid and checkerboard to lead to stability, but more often than not these normally regular fields are set ajar, slid apart, flipped open, broken, or misaligned. This is not art that panders, but rather insists that we engage by visually assembling, disassembling, and reassembling each work’s constituent parts in order to see, experience, and understand a holistic image and object. This is one way that Weathersby’s art extends painting’s possibilities.
Weathersby also extends paintings’s possibilities via the emotional and psychological spaces and situations it instigates. Intellectually, we might encounter his work as a visual puzzle to be solved, but there is more at stake here. What is the emotion of assembly and disassembly, visibility and invisibility, regularity and disruption, and why is this interesting and how does it enhance our lives? What is the psychology of gaps, slips, incisions, displacements, and what use is this to us? Weathersby’s art isn’t cruel or demanding, but is instead made with the utmost regard for the viewer, conveying integrity, openness, and generosity. Respectfully but rigorously, the spaces of the paintings echo the intimate, perplexing, meaningful spaces of ourselves, our bodies and thoughts, the things we acknowledge and know and attempt to share but are often beyond words. In this work we encounter our own self-knowledge and contradictions, aspirations and ambiguity. By confronting the parts of Weathersby’s art we can experience something in bits and pieces as right and whole in many different configurations and encounters. This is Weathersby’s diamond, painting’s health, and Art’s payoff.
Chris Ashley
Oakland, CA
August 2011

192 (ptch):


192 (ptch), 2011, acrylic and graphite over linen over wood, 30" x 20"
Ken Weathersby
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192 (ptch), process 3
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192 (ptch), process 2
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192 (ptch), process1
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192 (ptch), mini (less than 10" tall) 
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Thursday, September 1, 2011

Upcoming, unending:


 click image to enlarge

  


Without End 
I'll be in this five-person show at University of Delaware's Crane Gallery in Philadelphia.
“… In this exhibition, the work selected looks through the lens of process in making art, and specifically the construction and deconstruction of ideas, formula, aesthetics and memory…”
Sept. 8 - Oct. 6, 2011 (reception Sept. 8, 6-9pm)
Crane Gallery
1400 American St.
Philadelphia, PA
and in...
click image to enlarge
Faction
a group show, at University of Dayton, in Dayton, Ohio.
Oct. 3 - Oct. 24, 2011 (reception Tuesday, October 18th, 6 - 8pm.
Art Street, Studio D
University of Dayton
Dayton Ohio, 45469

Sunday, July 17, 2011

the pencil of nature:

I've been steadily photographing here since I moved into Aferro Studios in Newark in February.  I use the camera for a number of reasons.  As I work, I find that I'm constantly inventing (reinventing, I'm sure) ways to do things.  Sometimes in the middle of it I notice that I'm interested, in sort of a detached way, in how a process looks.  I try to record those views.  I also want to remember specific things that I did, and especially to recall ideas that emerged on the way to something else.  I take a lot of notes and make lots of little sketches, but photography is another way to keep an idea around.


an array of very small works, 2011
Ken Weathersby
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process image, 2011
Ken Weathersby
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idea / process, 2011
Ken Weathersby
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process image, 2011
Ken Weathersby
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painting wall, 2011
Ken Weathersby
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Monday, June 13, 2011

For coffee II:

187 process, studio shot, 6-11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge 






187 process (verso), studio shot, 6-12-11
Ken Weathersby
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187 process (woven birch and gel), studio shot, 6-12-11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge 

Thursday, May 26, 2011

In California, upcoming, (#1):

13 small works, less than 5" tall, (studio shot) collaged paper, linen, acrylic & graphite on canvas on archival foam board
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge


I'll be showing an array of very small works (including some of those shown above) at Some Walls, a curatorial and writing project in a private home in Oakland, California directed by artist and writer Chris Ashley. 

The work will be on view there from August 7 through September 25, 2011.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

For coffee:

 
coffeesketch2a, process drawing, digital, 5-18-2011
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge
 

Monday, May 2, 2011

Wall:

studio wall with double D reverse process, 5-1-11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge

Friday, April 29, 2011

183 (layover), 184 (doubleD), 185 collage:

183 (layover), acrylic & graphite on canvas, behind acrylic paint film, with wood, 19" x 16", 2011
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge







183 (layover - detail), acrylic & graphite on canvas, behind acrylic paint film, with wood, 19" x 16", 2011
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge






184 (doubleD), acrylic & graphite on canvas, with removed linear areas, 30" x 24", 2011
Ken Weathersby
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185 (collage), printed paper, linen, wood, about 2" tall, 2011
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

DD:

184 DD process, 4 - 2011
Ken Weathersby
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 184 DD process, 4 - 2011
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge





Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Layovers, and:

"layovers... " process on 4-20-11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge 




"layovers... " process on 4-20-11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge 





"layovers... " process on 4 -11
Ken Weathersby
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"layovers... " and 184 (DD) process on 4-20-11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge 




Thursday, April 7, 2011

PCR:

 Reg Bloor / Paranoid Critical Revolution
at Kent Place School 4-7-11
click image to enlarge



Reg Bloor / Paranoid Critical Revolution
at Kent Place School 4-7-11
click image to enlarge



(photos by Mariana Do Carmo)


Reg Bloor / "Paranoid Critical Revolution" performance at Kent Place School as visiting artist 4-7-11 for all upper school students and faculty.  She played a killer set, roughly 40 minutes straight through.

Guitarist Reg Bloor has been performing with Glenn Branca (to whom she is married) since 2000. She played in Branca’s Symphony # 12, Lesson #3, his rock band Branca/Bloor, in his trio, eventually becoming concertmaster for his Symphony #13 for 100 Guitars. She can be heard on Branca’s CD “The Ascension: The Sequel”. In the late 90’s she was a founding member of the Boston-based band TWITCHER, who released the CD “Leg of Lamb of God” in 1999 and appeared on the soundtrack of the Troma film “Terror Firmer”. In 2010, I saw her perform as Paranoid Critical Revolution in Brooklyn and at Le Poisson Rouge in NY.  She also played in the NYC debut of Glenn Branca’s Symphony #15 /Running Through the World Like an Open Razor.

The Paranoid Critical Revolution has been playing the NYC club scene since 2006. PCR’s debut CD “Death of the Cool” came out in Dec. 2007 just in time for the band to play ALL TOMORROW’S PARTIES, “A Nightmare Before Christmas” in Minehead, England. PCR played at the South by Southwest Music Festival in 2009, and at many other venues since.

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

To begin:

untitled, acrylic on canvas & printed paper collage over printed image of linen, about 4" x 3", 2 -11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge 




untitled, side view, acrylic on canvas & printed paper collage, about 4" x 3", 2 -11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge 




 untitled, printed paper collage over linen, about 4" x 3", 2 -11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge 



 untitled, sideview, printed paper collage over linen, about 4" x 3", 2 -11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge




untitled, printed paper collage over linen, about 4" x 3", 2 -11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge




untitled, printed paper collage, about 4" x 3", 3 -11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge




untitled, printed paper collage, about 4" x 3", 3 -11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge




untitled, acrylic on canvas, about 4" x 3", 2 -11
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge 




Tuesday, March 1, 2011

In print.:

173(Lnd) detail, acrylic on linen with reversed areas, 
Ken Weathersby 
click image to enlarge



New American Painting, Northeast Edition 2011 is now available at newstands and bookstores.
Three of my recent paintings are inside, and "173(Lnd)", detail above, is on the back cover.  The juror for this edition was Laura Hoptman, curator of Painting and Sculpture at the Museum of Modern Art, NY.





 

Sunday, February 20, 2011

Malleable:

179(twnR), detail, Ken Weathersby, 2010
click image to enlarge


Postconceptualism: the Malleable Object 
Opens March 10, 2011 at University of Maryland's Stamp Gallery

Artist panel-- March 17, 2011, 6pm.

Essay by Mark Cameron Boyd (excerpt):
"Postconceptualism: the Malleable Object explores the work of nine artists who individually extend and expand upon the theories and ideas of Conceptual Art in unique ways...

...Recent work by Ken Weathersby resurrects painting through a negotiation between the intellectual and physical properties of the support. Weathersby subverts the 'language of painting' through a three-dimensional manipulation that disrupts our perception by creating a 'no-space space.'..."


(full text here)

Friday, February 18, 2011

New Ark:

aferro studios, Newark, NJ



My studio at home has become something of a puzzle with many complicated moving parts--work in progress and tools and books take up an increasing amount of the space. 

Starting tomorrow, I'll be doing a residency at Aferro Studios in Newark, NJ.  The residency goes until August of 2011, so for the next six months, I'll see what it's like to work a little differently.  It will be the first time since my loft in Williamsburg in the 90's that I'll have a dedicated, work-only studio space of over 1,200 sq. feet.  The studio at Aferro should allow me to spread out and work on more projects at once, and on larger pieces.

Evonne Davis and Emma Wilcox run the program there, and they seem to have a good thing going, attracting interesting artists from all over.

Gallery Aferro

Aferro Studios Blog 

Sunday, February 6, 2011

Hallucination:


sweet stain, oil, acrylic, pencil & ink on canvas, paper, wood & cashmere 
Bruce Stiglich
click image to enlarge


“Accumulation/Hallucination” 

Bruce Stiglich’s “Accumulation/Hallucination” 
Kent Place Gallery Monday, February 14 – Friday,  March 11
closing reception 6—8 pm on Friday March 11.

Works in the show combine painting, drawing and the gathering of found objects to create complex, beautiful and densely painted collections of surfaces and images. 

“Sweet Stain” (above), uses a wide range of means, including oil paint, acrylic, graphite, ink, wood, and, crucially, cashmere.  A tiny scrap of stained cashmere formed the starting point of this complex work.  Stiglich painted a portrait of the scrap of fabric, enlarged and copied his own painting, represented it again in another way, again and again, and each new view became a part of the whole. The cluster of representations contains mirrorings and repetitions, but also surprises that open up space for the imagination.  It is a kaleidoscopic outgrowth of remembering and reflecting.  Yet the subject (if that shred of stained fabric is really the subject) remains enigmatic.

Such a ceaseless return to a mute and mysterious object, and the possibly obsessive circling around it with art, brings to mind Citizen Kane’s rosebud, Proust’s madeleine, that little scrap of blue velvet so prized by Frank in David Lynch’s film.  The point for me is that Stiglich creates an exciting, almost hallucinatory visual world, and the work resists collapsing into an easy interpretation.

New York Times art critic Ken Johnson has said, “Style in Bruce Stiglich's work is psychological, as the seemingly obsessive repetition of tiny marks that build up into dense vibrating textures suggest the feverishly compulsive activity of an inspired monomaniac. You may be reminded of Jackson Pollock's drip works or folk artists who are driven to decorate their homes with countless polka dots or flattened beer cans.”

Bruce says, “My work is a compiling of personal history.  I work in series.  These series become installations.  They span an extended period of time.  It begins with a discovery of found images, objects and doodles that to me seem incomplete.  The process of completing the images is self referential in nature.”

Bruce Stiglich’s art work has been seen in numerous exhibitions in recent years in New York City and the New York area, in Pennsylvania, and in Miami, Florida.  He currently teaches at Parsons School of Design, and has also taught at Pont-Aven School of Art in France, and at the State University of New York.  He has been a curator of several art exhibitions at MyPAC, in Miami, FL.

Kent Place Gallery
42 Norwood Ave.
Summit, NJ 07902

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