Friday, December 24, 2010

Sample 5:


Tky - process, sound hardware installed, 12-24-10
Ken Weathersby
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Tky - first sketch, 4-09
Ken Weathersby
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This painting is almost finished.  It just needs final installation of the audio, an mp3 playback of sound recorded in the making and painting of the two panels (sounds of painting, applying and peeling masking tape, sanding, sawing, stapling, etc.).  The sound was captured and then organized for the looped soundtracks by composer and musician Matt Sargent.

Earlier posts about this project:





Wednesday, December 15, 2010

A basement:

Holiday Inn, Saddlebrook, New Jersey


The management seminar is being held in the Holiday Inn basement.

I've got a stack of papers in my hand that L___, our presenter gave me.  Almost all of it is catalogs and order forms for other seminars and accompanying books about management training themes, but sliced into different specialties. 

L___ steps to the the front of the room. 

He gives notes, suggestions, tells anecdotes and mentions his wife and kids, walking back and forth.  He occasionally refers to, but mostly ignores, the powerpoint slides with bullet points on the screen. He has clearly digested a lot of popular management books and statistics, and says he will make this practical and something we can all start to use right away, "not philosophy or theory". That pre-digested management wisdom is to be the "content" of the seminar. We take notes.

***

What I first thought was L___'s unified voice is really an unspecified number of different voices.  Sometimes L___ makes a point in a voice that it seems we are to take as coming from him, but which sounds very much like popular right wing TV commentator Bill O'Reilly.  I wonder if mass audience pundit/talking head figures from radio and TV must be a ubiquitous source of style in this type of performance.  I think about how rare a seemingly novel approach to form must be in this field, as in any other.  Several other familiar mimicked voices are used by L___ in a way that suggests that they are L___'s own voice, a voice of sincerity and authority, in contrast to the various "funny" or "persona" voices he uses as counterpoint.  These other voices are usually marked as funny or satirical by their more exaggerated sounds and body languages.  

There is the ostentatious windbag "bad manager" who thinks he's smart, but is doing something dumb (this one seems lifted from vocal stylings used by radio personality Rush Limbaugh). It has a huffing, self-regarding tone and a stiff body posture. 

There is the voice of "L__'s wife" (just a falsetto, sometimes crying), with flailing hand gestures. 

There is a version of L___ that is a humorously enraged and screaming comic over-reaction to something (a little like comedian Lewis Black).  He almost falls over with loss of control during that one. 

And there is one persona that L___ actually gives a name, "Wilbur".  Wilbur is different.  L___ explicitly tells us who Wilbur is, introduces us to him instead of just slipping him in (or slipping into him.)   L___ both acts out Wilbur, and refers to him in the third person.  Wilbur is the embodiment of the dumb, screw-up employee, the office scapegoat.  The worst nightmare for a manager.  Wilbur has a "goofy" voice, clownish, choked, and a little lispy, and spazzy body language, and recurs as a character throughout the two days of the seminar. More than with the other personae, we are meant to notice when Wilbur reappears-- "Oh no, here comes Wilbur again!"


***


I've been thinking about forms of presentation.  What is meant to be seen and heard, what is conceived as "content", and what is considered just part of the delivery system, what's meant to be ignored, and what is meant as sugar to help the medicine go down.  There is so much that happens in those wrong parts.

Saturday, December 4, 2010

180 (nmls) process:

sketches: gpy 2/jr. and 180 (nmls)
Ken Weathersby
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 process, 180 (nmls)
Ken Weathersby
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 process, (180 nmls)
Ken Weathersby
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process, 180 (nmls) 
Ken Weathersby  
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 process, 180 (nmls) 
Ken Weathersby  
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 process, 180 (nmls) 
Ken Weathersby  
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 process, 180 (nmls) 
Ken Weathersby  
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180 (nmls) digital mockup
Ken Weathersby
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180 (nmls) digital mockup detail
Ken Weathersby
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continuities interrupted 

interruptions (cuts, breaks, fades) disguised, erased, repaired
(compensated)

interruptions & compensations isolated, sublimated, submerged

Sunday, November 21, 2010

PDM:

amy davis in a still from Pig Death Machine

 

I'm looking forward to seeing PIG DEATH MACHINE, a new Jon Moritsugu + Amy Davis feature movie that has been shot and will be out in 2011. 

It's a psychological horror screwball comedy-- and I'll get to see my name in the credits! They partially funded the project through small contributions, and some of the contributors will get an on-screen thank you. I purchased a tiny amount of fame for a tiny amount of money. I would have supported this anyway, though.

I am a longtime fan of Jon's punk rock aesthetic and totally independent approach to film.  I was fortunate enough to meet him years ago through his sister, the excellent painter Alison Moritsugu (one of my first artist-friends when I moved to NYC in 1990).

Previous films by Jon, or Jon + Amy include:

2002 Scumrock  [Best Feature / New York Underground Film Festival]
1997 Fame Whore  [Best Feature / New York Underground Film Festival]
more Jon + Amy's info at IMDb here


#15, Branca:


Glenn Branca debuted his Symphony # 15 / Running Through the World Like an Open Razor at Le Poisson Rouge last night.  

Michele and I were there early and were seated front and center by the low stage. As it turned out I was less than two feet away from the back of Branca's black coattails as he conducted.  I had the pleasure of looking over his shoulder at the hand-penciled pages of the score and notes on the pedestal in front of him and at his feet. 

The stage was crowded with musicians, and even more so with the jumble of multiple instruments each would play during the piece.  Among the players was Reg Bloor (whose fantastic experimental group Paranoid Critical Revolution will perform at Kent Place this spring).

Each movement was a differently shaped large open field of sound.  The opening, cymbal-based section, like some of the later guitar-oriented ones, developed into a huge wave of mounting intensity.  These sections evolved with nuance and subtlety, but I never lost sight of the whole washing over me.  This was in keeping with my experience hearing Branca's guitar pieces in the past, a feeling of powerful insistent frontality, singularity and strong emotion.

Movements that incorporated strange and varied instruments and toys, especially when chance operations came into play (instrumentalists rolling dice or consulting the I-Ching before sounding a harmonica or rattling sticks), evoked a landscape flecked with countless colors, textures and little absurdities.  I pictured Bosch or Bruegel paintings, like Bruegel's 'Childrens Games', where there is a beauty and largeness of conception, a seemingly comprehensive world view, but populated and punctuated and by tiny playful acts of lovely futility.  

To me the whole sustained a fantastic tension: a forceful forward movement, an expansiveness, crucially kept at bay by a humor of sardonic negativity.


children's games, jan bruegel, 1560
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Monday, November 15, 2010

YHBHS:



I was recently interviewed on the fantastic LA- based blog 
You Have Been Here Sometime
To read the full text, 

Go here.


--------


An excerpt:
Your work blurs the line between sculpture and painting. The work you so graciously donated to the LACE auction could be viewed from the front and back. I found myself wanting others to see it from both sides. Do you work both sides of the canvas and supports on purpose, or is this a byproduct of the design? Have you ever considered showing your works so that your audience can see both sides?


Since I deal with the real space of painting, people seem to wonder about the relationship to sculpture. Sometimes I do allow the both sides of the painting to be seen in some way. Like in the paintings 153 (c & a), or 163 (d & g), the painting is paired with another part that, in a way, shows what is hidden, or almost shows it. But it remains about painting, not sculpture.

For me it all comes out of the given aspects of painting as a tradition, as a medium and as a set of conventions. Paintings are generally, normally considered one-sided, visual, they have parts meant to be seen (the colored paint, seen from the front) and parts not meant to be seen (the back of the linen or canvas, the staples, the wood stretchers, etc.) Things I’m doing seem to work in relation to that. It’s not that I want to emphasize the idea of the importance of painting, or celebrate the tradition (I find that boring). It’s more that it’s just this medium and set of conventions I’m intimate with. I’ve looked at paintings and made paintings for a while now, and I can use that familiarity to create kind of suspended or unresolved situations. Seeing the back of a painting or being denied access to an image or part of an image in a painting is one thing. If I was making sculpture it wouldn’t be the same since we know that all sides of sculpture are usually intended to be seen, and there are always parts of it that can’t be seen from a particular view. I think my paintings would be boring as sculptures; the element of wrongness would be taken away.



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Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Preview update:


179 (twnR - detail)
2010
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge

I'll be showing new paintings (like the one above) with Pierogi Gallery at SEVEN - Miami 
Nov. 30 - Dec. 5, 2010

Pierogi Gallery, Hales Gallery, Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, BravinLee Programs, Postmasters Gallery, P.P.O.W and Winkleman Gallery will present a special exhibition in the Wynwood District during the art fair week in Miami.

SEVEN
2214 North Miami Ave. Wynwood District
Miami, FL 33217




Sunday, October 24, 2010

Aqua twin:


 drawing (104), first sketches, 8-2010
Ken Weathersby
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 drawing (104A), process / detail, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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 drawing (104A), process / detail, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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  drawing (104A), process / detail, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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drawing (104A), ink on paper with graphite and acrylic on on linen over panel inset, 20"x15", 2010
Ken Weathersby
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drawing (104A raking view), ink on paper with graphite and acrylic on on linen over panel inset, 20"x15", 2010
Ken Weathersby
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drawing (104A) & drawing (104B), ink on paper with graphite and acrylic on on linen over panel inset, each 20"x15", 2010
Ken Weathersby
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JCJ, Closer:

Now This Is Fun, enamel on plexi, 8" x 10", 2010
Jeffrey Cortland Jones
click image to enlarge

"Closer, Still" Jeffrey Cortland Jones
October 22 - November 19, 2010

@Kent Place Gallery
42 Norwood Avenue
Summit, NJ

kentplacegallery

The artist works on relatively small sheets of smooth and reflective plexiglass. He applies enamel paint to cover, edge, mark or blur the surfaces. By doing so, he continually unfolds a multiplicity of expression and play within a rigorous and serious vein of abstract painting.

There is an exciting dynamic in these works between transparency, translucency and opacity. Partly through the development of that dynamic, there is an important, shifting balance between atmosphere and object. Some surprising nuances emerge from the paint on the backs of the panels, in some cases not directly seen, but reflecting off the wall to give bit of colored halo to an edge, sometimes showing through superimposed layers, sometimes crawling onto or around the side of a panel just enough to do something interesting.   

We tend to want to see through or into the space in paintings. Here we do, but our gaze is both allowed and contained. Our attention is brought to the fact of the material, of the object. We feel we are getting a partial view, a glimpse, like a quick look out the window of a fast moving car, but we never see more than what we could touch.

Jones offers the following: “Painting is simply: obsessive, correcting, locating, apprehending, pigment, fog, field, continuous, resistance.” 


Friday, September 17, 2010

Visitation:


 winter beach, watercolor on paper
Polina Barskaya
click image to enlarge



Polina Barskaya exhibition “The Visitors”

@Kent Place Gallery
September 15 – October 8, 2010
Reception September 23, 2010, 6 - 8 pm.

info & directions: 

Barsakaya:
"I was born in Ukraine in 1984, which was still part of the Soviet Union. When I was 4 years old most of my family immigrated to the United States as political refugees… I grew up in Brighton Beach, a predominantly Russian-Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn… American television was a big influence on me. My reality was defined by Old World Soviet-Jewish mentality and New World American values and freedoms…" 

She takes a keen interest in the complexity of character and situation in the works of Godard, Fellini, Almodovar and Woody Allen:
"…one goal I have is to be able to do what a filmmaker does, only with paint."

Monday, September 6, 2010

Preview:

drawing 100, graphite & ink on paper with graphite and acrylic on linen over panel insets, 2010
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge 

Upcoming Shows...

CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION
USM Museum of Art, Hattiesburg, MS.
Oct. 21 - Nov. 20, 2010

AQUA ART FAIR Miami 
with Horse Trader Projects.
Dec. 1 - 5, 2010

THERELY BARE 
traveling show curated by John Tallman and Ron Buffington.
AVA Gallery
30 Frazier Ave
Chattanooga, TN 37450

423-265-4282
January 14, 2011 – February 25, 2011
Opening Reception: Friday, January 14, 5 to 8pm


Zeitgeist Gallery
1819 21st Ave S
Nashville, TN 37212-3705
(615) 256-4805
March 3, 2011- April 2, 2011
Opening Reception: TBA



POSTCONCEPTUALISM: THE MALLEABLE OBJECT 
University of Maryland Stamp Gallery, curated by Mark Cameron Boyd.
March 7 - April 8, 2011

...more details later

Friday, September 3, 2010

You know which way the wind blows (YAtW V & VI):


you are the weatherman V
and you are the weatherman VI, injet prints, framed, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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you are the weatherman V
, inkjet print, framed, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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you are the weatherman V - detail

Ken Weathersby
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you are the weatherman VI
, injet print, framed, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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you are the weatherman VI - detail

Ken Weathersby
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Friday, August 27, 2010

Sidekick & sidekick's sidekick:


179 (TwnL) and 179 (TwnR), acrylic paint film with removed area over wood scaffolding over linen
2010
ken weathersby
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179 (Twn) process, 2010
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179 (Twn) process, 2010
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179 (Twn) process, 2010
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179 (TwnR), acrylic paint film with removed area over wood scaffolding over linen
2010
ken weathersby
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Wood structure is alienating the image-bearing face, the paint film, away from its presumed support, the linen. And the painting is twins, not as identical clones, but as mirror reflections.

Monday, July 26, 2010

YAtW, II, III & IV:

you are the weatherman II, inkjet prints, framed, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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you are the weatherman III, inkjet prints, framed, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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you are the weatherman III (detail), inkjet prints, framed, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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you are the weatherman IV, inkjet prints, framed, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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you are the weatherman IV (detail), inkjet prints, framed, 2010
Ken Weathersby
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(you are the weatherman (I) is here)





Sunday, July 25, 2010

Process hLLL (more):

178(hLLL), process, 7-2010
Ken Weathersby
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178(hLLL), process, 7-2010
Ken Weathersby
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178(hLLL), process, 7-2010
Ken Weathersby
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178(hLLL), process, 7-2010
Ken Weathersby
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178(hLLL), detail, 7-24-2010
Ken Weathersby
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178(hLLL), detail, 7-24-2010
Ken Weathersby
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178(hLLL), studio shot, 7-24-2010
Ken Weathersby
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Thursday, July 1, 2010

Process, hLLL:

178 (hLLL), process, 7-1-2010
Ken Weathersby
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178 (hLLL), process, 7-1-2010
Ken Weathersby
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178 (hLLL), process, 7-1-2010
Ken Weathersby
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178 (hLLL), process, 7-1-2010
Ken Weathersby
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