Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Sample 2:


tky sketch, ink & graphite on paper, 4-4-2009
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge


notes, 6-19-2009, ink on paper, (and contact mic on masonite fragment)
Matt Sargent
click image to enlarge


front face of MAX/MSP patch, screenshot, 6-26-2009
Matt Sargent
click image to enlarge

Tky panel one, painted, acrylic & graphite on canvas, 6-30-2009
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge

Monday, June 29, 2009

Return:

The Mount, front gate and door, photo by Michele Alpern, 2009
click image to enlarge


We just spent a few days in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts. It was our second trip to Lenox and like last time, we visited The Mount, the house Edith Wharton designed and built there. (Construction was completed in 1902.) It's where she did much of her writing, and spent time with selected visitors (like frequent guest Henry James). She was seriously interested in architecture and this house is a reflection of her careful distillation of ideas found in other great American houses of the period, but also from French and Italian sources. In a more substantial way the house is the opposite of other late 19th century grand homes. (Of course it is-- her books brilliantly examine and critique the convoluted social structures and pretensions of the set that built those houses). The Mount is modern, ahead of its time. It is anti-ostentatious, meant for quiet work and conversation, not giant parties. It's a house for an artist.


The Mount, Edith Wharton's library / study, photo by Michele Alpern, 2009
click image to enlarge


The library is a squarish room, it's full of light and owns a corner of the house on the first (not ground) floor. You might think this would be where her work took place. Actually the real writing went on in her bedroom, where she worked with her papers and books spread over the bed, and with her dogs all around. This room occupies the same power corner as the library, directly above it, on the second floor.


The Mount, Edith Wharton's bed was here, photo by Michele Alpern, 2009
click image to enlarge


The drawing room, at the center of the house, was set up for fostering conversation. The space was broken into several seating areas, which were sometimes made even more intimate by setting up folding screens. This room opens out onto the terrace.


The Mount, sitting room, photo by Ken Weathersby, 2009
click image to enlarge



The Mount, terrace, photo by Michele Alpern, 2009
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The Mount, view from terrace over gardens, photo by Michele Alpern, 2009
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Looking down from the terrace, there are two gardens, one to the right and one to the left. The one to the left, is higher, brighter and laid out in nested rectangles. It is rational, clear, and dry in feeling. To the right side is, a low grotto-like garden, laid out in curves, surrounded with rough stone walls and shaded. The standing contrast between the two, connected by a long, straight tree-lined path between, is powerful.


The Mount, gardens--the high garden, photo by Ken Weathersby, 2009
click image to enlarge



The Mount, gardens--the low garden, photo by Ken Weathersby, 2009
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The Mount, gardens--the low garden-- Michele in the grotto, photo by Ken Weathersby, 2009
click image to enlarge


Also near Lenox, in Pittsfield, Arrowhead a farmhouse property that was home to another great 19th century writer. Herman Melville did not have the financial (and other kinds of) success that Wharton saw, and Arrowhead is a different kind of place. Arrowhead is very interesting in its own right, but it was rainy during our visit, and little that's in the house now belonged to him, so we took no photos. We did have a strange experience with a tour guide who was very knowledgeable with details about the recorded history of the place. He had an interest in Melville as someone he thought of as an outstanding fellow who'd had some adventures on the sea, and which he had written down. He also had zero knowledge or interest in the fact that the guy was an artist, and confessed to not being able to force himself to read the books, even Moby Dick. We left glad we'd been there but horrified at the tourguide. We bought a postcard.

Herman Melville postcard (souvenir of Arrowhead), photo by Ken Weathersby, 2009
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Borrowing:


153 maquette (c & a -detail), colored pencil, graphite, collage on board, 2007
Ken Weathersby
click image to enlarge

Roland Barthes, from S/Z (translation 1974):
In the classic text, the majority of the utterances are assigned an origin, we can identify their parentage, who is speaking: either a consciousness... or a culture...; however, it may happen that in the classic text, always haunted by the appropriation of speech, the voice gets lost, as though it had leaked out through a hole in the discourse. The best way to conceive the classical plural is then to listen to the text as an iridescent exchange carried on by multiple voices, on different wavelengths and subject from time to time to a sudden dissolve, leaving a gap which enables the utterance to shift from one point of view to another, without warning: the writing is set up across this tonal instability... which makes it a glistening texture of ephemeral origin. [une moire brillante d'origines d'ephemeres]


Saturday, June 20, 2009

Sample:







6-19-09 process shots, from top:

contact mic on studio table

untitled / two canvases in progress

mic that recorded stapling, sawing, application of paint, also birds and lawnmower outside window

untitled / canvas one (in progress)

Matt's recording setup

click images to enlarge

Matt Sargent visited yesterday and we began working on a project which will be composed of sound (music) and visual and tactile objects (painting). The various aspects are developing together. Matt used contact mics made from doorbell mechanisms, and other equipment to gather and begin to organize studio sounds while I painted.

More about Matt:
http://www.mattsargentmusic.com/

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Falling:


ka & wrstlr, digital drawing, 2009
ken weathersby
click image to enlarge