Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Q process:

175 (q), process, 2009
Ken Weathersby
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175 (q), process, 2009
Ken Weathersby
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175 (q), first thought, 2009
Ken Weathersby
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Monday, December 14, 2009

Buried, driven:

At the New Museum:
SkowheganTALKS with Fred Tomaselli and John O'Connor. (12-12-2009)
John O'Connor screened this image of Bob from Twin Peaks (David Lynch's tv series). This charactor buried information in his murder victims by "collaging" cut-out letters under their finger nails.
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Another image screened by O'Connor. The Cardiff Giant was a 19th century hoax. The sculpture, buried and then "discovered", was taken to be a petrified giant. It became part of a debate over a naive (biblical) account of ancient history.
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Cardiff Giant
John O'Connor, ink and colored pencil on paper, 2009
The giant story unearthed / translated into a drawing.
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Guilty
Fred Tomaselli, print, 2005
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Dr. Atkins’s Code of Independence
John O'Connor, colored pencil on paper, 2005
78" x 59"
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O'Connor on "Dr. Atkin's Code of Independence":
"I became inspired to make this drawing while looking at the ancient Egyptian grid systems employed to represent social hierarchy via a pharaoh’s idealism. The system I invented to generate the colors of the grid was based on the size of the language used in various texts – the lengths of words, sentences and paragraphs. It became an indecipherable code. I began the drawing by randomly scribbling across the paper. I then marked the intersection points of the lines and connected them to create the dominant shape in the work. Next, I drew the grid across the entire form and began to apply the system. The system linked the sizes of words, sentences and paragraphs to corresponding colors. For example, if a word was 5 letters in length, it would be red. If it was 10 letters long, it would be silver. The lengths of the sentences are also encoded this way. The sizes of the paragraphs are marked with alternating orange and violet pairs of squares. Finally, a change in text is marked by 4 fluorescent squares. I chose a wide range of texts to encode. I began with the Atkins’ Diet and included works such as Chaos, Declaration of Independence, Bible Code, Dante’s Inferno, How to Build a Time Machine, Rethinking Intuition, The Da Vinci Code and numerous others. The title of each text is written in proximity to its pattern on the grid. Lastly, the color of the larger areas along with the grey central section were determined through chance."


Two terms that were used in the event at the New Museum were "buried narratives" and "information driven". The conversation was an examination of particular works by the two artists (Tomaselli and O'Connor) and an exploration of how their visual choices might relate to "content".

John said that when he and Fred first met several years ago (in John's studio at Skowhegan), Fred looked at the large, complex drawing John was working on, full of diagrammatic information, text, numbers, etc., and wanted to know, "Is there anything behind that, does it mean anything, or is it bullshit?" It turned out that the drawing they were looking at was John investigating and processing his research about Alzheimer's, which a family member was going through at the time. Apparently that was the seed of the talk. I guess that could constitute a "buried narrative", though maybe it's more accurate to call John's work "information driven". I think "buried narrative" is a term Fred brought into the discussion. In either case, I take it to mean that visual choices are fostered by information (whether a story or statistics) that determine or propel abstract visual choices, and that while the end result is derived from and inseparable from that material, the sources may not be transparently available in the final result. O'Connor often cites John Cage, but with O'Connor's work it is different from some who've used chance, the I-Ching or whatever, in that John doesn't shy away from including a lot of personal stuff-- his weight, recordings of his own sleep-talking utterances, or the investigation into the illness of a relative. This is an openness to things that can express a certain vulnerability. Tomaselli talked about how various of his own works were generated out of and tied to his personal stories and experiences. I like Tomaselli's work very much, but I find the relationships John creates between narrative or information and image in his complex drawings particularly unconventional and unique.

Saturday, December 5, 2009

Grit index 2:



174 (grt), wood, sandpaper, acrylic on linen, brass hinges, 2009
ken weathersby
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Wednesday, December 2, 2009

Wfp?:

wfp?, digital drawing, 12-1-2009
ken weathersby
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Thursday, November 26, 2009

Lnd (formerly known as Lnn idea):

173 (Lnd), 2009
Ken Weathersby
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173 (Lnd - reverse), 2009
Ken Weathersby
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173 (Lnd), process, 2009
Ken Weathersby
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173 (Lnd), process, 2009
Ken Weathersby
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Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Gpy:

172 (gpy), 2009
Ken Weathersby
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172 (gpy - detail), 2009
Ken Weathersby
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Sunday, November 1, 2009

Re gpy:

10 roosevelt windows, 11-1-09
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fudo myoo, japan, 1000 c.e.
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gpy, first sketch, from bound book #64, 2007
Ken Weathersby
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Gpy process 2:

gpy, process, back with inset, 10-09
Ken Weathersby
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gpy, process, areas removed, 10-09
Ken Weathersby
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gpy, process, 10-09
Ken Weathersby
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Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Gst, trc, or scr:


gst-171, 2009
(panels removed and then replaced in wall, seams "repaired")
existing wall (sheetrock), Kent Place Gallery
Ken Weathersby
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At Kent Place Gallery:

(installation view) A Few Months, HTML drawings
Chris Ashley
at Kent Place Gallery
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(detail) month of january, 2009, HTML drawings
Chris Ashley
courtesy of George Lawson Gallery


I selected five months of HTML drawings by Chris Ashley for a show at Kent Place Gallery. For those in the New York area, it's a quick trip by car or rail to Summit, NJ. The show opens October 19 and will be up until November 20. There is a reception at the gallery on October 23, 6-8 pm.

Chris Ashley produces beautiful, jewel-like colored drawings. He creates a fresh drawing, each one a new and unique idea, every single day. His medium for this daily discipline is HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language), a digital process not usually associated with fine art in the sense of traditional painting and drawing. Ashley’s work shows that it can be an ideal medium both for aesthetic delight as well as endless invention.


This ongoing string of artistic variations is made to exist primarily within a digital world, since HTML is native to the internet. For years now the drawings have been published daily on his blog, “Look, See—“ (http://looksee.chrisashley.net/), but for this exhibition at Kent Place Gallery, Ashley presents five months’ worth of carefully printed images of his HTML works, which will be displayed in the gallery grouped in five large blocks, one block on each wall of the gallery, like five calendars. This provides the chance to see the images simultaneously, note the evolution of Ashley’s ideas, and compare work produced at different times.

Kent Place Gallery is on the campus of Kent Place School, 42 Norwood Avenue, Summit, NJ. Gallery hours are Monday - Friday, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. For more information visit www.kentplace.org.


Wednesday, October 7, 2009

Grit index:


sand paper painting idea, graphite & archival ink on arches paper 2009
Ken Weathersby
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Sunday, October 4, 2009

Gpy process:

gpy, 2 mock-ups, 10-09
Ken Weathersby
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Thursday, September 24, 2009

Symmetry / Aphrodite:


a partial thought, graphite, colored pencil & archival ink on arches paper 2009
Ken Weathersby
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Sunday, September 20, 2009

Reverse of the Reverse 2:

The Reverse Side Also Has a Reverse Side

Kent Place Gallery
September 10 - October 9, 2009
Kent Place Gallery, 42 Norwood Avenue, Summit, NJ 07902
Opening Reception, Thursday, September 10, 6-8pm

http://www.kentplace.org/news


Installation views:



167 (bgbjrid), 2009, 170, 2009
Ken Weathersby
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171
, 2009
(panels inset in wall)
Ken Weathersby
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169 (k & w), 2009, 162 (nfc), 2008
Ken Weathersby
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164 (mcb), 2009, 158 (ar), 2008, 168 (bgb), 2009
Ken Weathersby
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164 (mcb), 2009, KW, 1963, 158 (ar), 2008
Ken Weathersby
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Monday, September 7, 2009

Falling 2:


169(k & w), process, 8-09
Ken Weathersby
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169(k & w), process, 8-09
Ken Weathersby
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Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Reverse of the Reverse:

165 (wky), detail, 2009

The Reverse Side Also Has a Reverse Side
Ken Weathersby - Exhibition / Installation

September 10 - October 10, 2009
Kent Place Gallery, 42 Norwood Avenue, Summit, NJ 07902
Opening Reception, Thursday, September 10, 6-8pm

http://www.kentplace.org/news

Monday, August 17, 2009

Star:

star, acrylic, ink, gesso on shaped paper with cut out areas, 2009
John O'Connor
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star on our wall
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"Board shaped according to most recent Dow numbers, plotted via my own invented system as lines emanating from the center." --John O'Connor

John's piece seems both plausibly neutral-- it's generated from some kind of systemic use of data, after all-- and at the same time suggests an out-picturing of a psychological state related to the recent / current financial panic. Assembling the cut-out letters that punctuate the tips of each point of star, the text spells "man made monster".

We love it.

See more of John's work here.

Friday, July 31, 2009

Bgb process 3:

168 (bgb), acrylic & graphite on canvas with inset panels, 7-30-2009
Ken Weathersby
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168 (bgb - detail), acrylic & graphite on canvas with inset panels, 7-30-2009
Ken Weathersby
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bgb, process (back with insets), 7-2009
Ken Weathersby
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Friday, July 24, 2009

Bgbjrid:

167 (bgbjrid), 2009
Ken Weathersby
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Monday, July 20, 2009

Bgb process 2:

bgb, process, 7-19-09
Ken Weathersby
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bgb, process, 7-19-09
Ken Weathersby
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bgb, process, 7-19-09
Ken Weathersby
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166 (Grdy)

166 (Grdy), acrylic & graphite on linen, 7-19-09
Ken Weathersby
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166 (Grdy), back, process, 7-19-09
Ken Weathersby
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Thursday, July 16, 2009

Grdy & Lnn:

Grdy, sketches, 6-11-09
Ken Weathersby
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Lnn idea, process, 7-15-09
Ken Weathersby
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Friday, July 10, 2009

Bgb process:

bgb, process, 7-9-09
Ken Weathersby
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bgb, process, 7-9-09
Ken Weathersby
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bgb, process, 7-9-09
Ken Weathersby
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